Wednesday, April 16

An Excellent Doctor.....




is hard to find, wouldn't you say? Recently, mr. kenju had to have a biopsy. It is a sensitive area for any man; but especially so for one who has not been to a doctor in years. We were recommended to a urologist, hereinafter known as Bob. Bob took the time to get to know mr. kenju; he was very kind, solicitous, gentle and professional. He proffered a pill (to be taken the morning of the test) to relax mr. kenju, as he could see the building stress and anxiety.

Some of that anxiety came from well-meaning friends and relatives who felt compelled to share their horror stories about similar tests (why do people do that??) Long story short (which, as you know, is hard for me), mr. kenju flew through it with flying colors; experiencing no pain to speak of and little discomfort later. He then recommended two of his friends with similar symptoms to go to the same doctor. They were pleased with his service and attention.

Imagine our surprise when being told that this wonderful doctor was being let go from his university-run practice. The reasons given (and we cannot confirm them yet) were that (a. he doesn't bring enough patients into the system and (b. he spends too much time with his patients. Do those sound like a negatives to you? They sure don't to me.

My suggestion to mr. kenju was that he and his two friends ought to write a letter to that university system, telling of their experiences with this doctor and asking them to reconsider letting him go. Can you think of anything else we should do?

20 comments:

Betty said...

A letter sounds like a good idea, but don't get your hopes up. Maybe the doctor will go into private practice with a group or by himself close enough to continue going to him.

Star said...

Wee, that really says something about healthcare.The letter sounds like a good idea. Anything more public may or may not serve the Dr.'s best interests. Hopefully you will be able to support him in his next practie, as I am sure a Dr. that good will be snapped up by someone.

Mar said...

I hope Bob remains in the area...

bobbie said...

How sad. Business raises its ugly head again, interfering with someone who cares enough to do the best job he can. And in such an important profession.

Grannymar said...

I thought cuts like that happened only in Ireland

Granny Annie said...

Your story is more common that you realize. We have the absolute BEST primary care physician ever. She was let go by her last group because she took too much time with patients. She started her own practice with a couple of other doctors and we followed her. When it comes to concerns about our health, she leaves no stone unturned.

Granny Annie said...

Also, we wrote a letter plus completed all their surveys very favorably and none of that did any good.

PI said...

That was a good experience. Just give it your best shot. Good luck and happy for you both.

utenzi said...

I work for an surgical oncologist and I can attest that they have a lot of pressure on them to increase patient numbers. Of course that's not good for the patients but....

Tabor said...

My daughter loved the doctor that delivered both her babies but was told that She had to change practice after 10 years due to the high insurance for delivering babies. It seems to go up every year regardless of the doctor's practice history. We have the most mixed up health care system!

tiff said...

The busines of practicing medicine is ugly. To have a good doc go under like this because they care too WELL for their patients is criminal.

The letter is a good idea - certainly can't hurt.

rosemary said...

It's all about the mighty bottom line...$$$$$. Sad fact of healthcare in America. Hopefully this physician can move into private practice and make it a good one and drive an older car.

Seamus said...

That's a terrible reason to let a doc go! Perhaps he needs to be in a private practice instead of in a "patient mill"!

JeanMac said...

By all means, the university and then the newspaper. See reults here of people who contact the paper.

Beverly said...

Oh my, what a pity. The dollar is the bottom line, isn't it.

Dianne said...

Similar thing happened to a doctor I adored. He was "warned" by the group he's part of that he needed to shorten the amount of time he spends with us.

Penny wise and health foolish!

Have you changed the look of your layout? It feels different. It looks great. Forgive me if this has been posted already, I'm way overworked.

Sonia A. Mascaro said...

Sure, a letter sounds a good idea.

Love your new header/banner photo!
Is it new, isn't?

Femail doc said...

Oh yes, ditto JeanMac--write a letter to the editor.

Several years ago, I decided I'd had it with private practice, so I applied to Kaiser. By the 4th interview, I discovered that 1) all scheduling was done off-site; I would have no control over time slots because 2) all appts. were for 20 minutes only and 3) all charting was done on-site, on computer, at the time of the visit.

So, all comers, new patients, old patients, patients with hangnails, depressed and anxious patients got 20 minutes. Period. And most of those minutes, I'm going to be looking at a computer screen.

I withdrew my application. Better my own boss underpaying me my employee than that arrangement!

Write letters!

CAROLYN said...

Could you write to your State Medical Board and ask their assistance in keeping him on?

OldOldLady Of The Hills said...

What a terrible terrible thing, Judy! That THEY can see these things as negative--especially the spending of time---Well, it is such a reflection of EVERYTHING that is wrong with our Health Care System now, isn't it!
I hope the letters do some good, my dear!